23/1/1917 The fall of Wajh and the advance of the Arab Revolt

Britain is supplying the Arab rebels through the Red Sea port of Yanbu. However the sea route there from Suez is long. If the rebels were to establish themselves in the port of Wajh, further north, it would be much easier to supply them. Wajh is also well situated to launch further attacks on the railway line to Medina, where a strong Turkish force remains in place.

The rebels and the British decide to launch a combined attack on Wajh. Emir Faisal, son of Sharif Hussein, rebel leader and self-styled King of the Arabs, will attack by land. The British navy supports his advance by placing water tanks south of the town to slake the thirst of Faisal’s army. The British will also land a small force of Arabs and British marines to the north of Wajh, to block any Turkish reinforcements.

Today is the agreed date for the attack on Wajh. The British ships arrive and land their men to the north of the town. There is no sign of Faisal, but the small advance party of rebels attack the town anyway. The Arabs are lucky: most of the Turkish garrison has already been withdrawn. Those that remain either surrender or retreat into the town’s mosque and fort, but they are soon dislodged by British naval artillery. Wajh is now in rebel hands.

And where is Faisal? The emir has been using his march to impress tribal leaders with the size of his army, thereby encouraging them to join his rebellion. When news of Wajh’s fall begins to circulate, the tribesmen flock to offer Faisal their allegiance.

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